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Welcome to Week 9

9 Week Old Fetus

Your Baby: Gender Differences

The growing embryo is about 1 inch long (25.4 mm). As its embryonic tail disappears and the face rounds out, the embryo is looking more human in shape. On the outside, hands and feet that looked like paddles just a week ago are now forming fingers and toes. On the inside, the pancreas, bile ducts, and gallbladder have formed. The reproductive organs are starting to develop as male or female.

Your Body: Worries, Concerns, and Fears

Most pregnant women are anxious about the child growing inside. Will he be healthy? Will she have 10 fingers and 10 toes? Even if you've had a child before, it's perfectly normal and understandable to worry.

But if you're so worried that it interferes with working, sleeping, or eating, you should take action. Try talking with your spouse, confiding in friends, consulting your doctor, or reading up on pregnancy and parenting. If none of these provide the comfort you need, consider seeking professional help.

On a Different Note: A Visual Tour

Peek-a-boo, I See You.

Ever wish you could be on the outside looking in? With this interactive tool, you can take a visual tour of the female reproductive system and better understand what's going on inside your body - baby and all.

Weekly Tip

After talking with your health care provider, try adding an exercise routine into your daily routine. Aim for 20 to 30 minutes of brisk walking daily. It might be as simple as taking a walk around the block on your lunch break or as subtle as doing 50 Kegel exercises at your desk (tensing the pelvic floor and vaginal muscles). Do whatever you have the time and energy for, but keep it up. In the long run, you'll feel better and it will help your postpartum recovery.




Review Date: 8/20/2019
Reviewed By: LaQuita Martinez, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Alpharetta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
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